Indiana Limestone

Gasoline- was once a waste product. It was thrown away, skimmed off the top of crude oil. Refinement and applications of it was an innovation.

It is my aspiration that a similar process is at a precipice with cut stone, and I intend to explore the possibilities.

Whenever limestone is processed, there are two waste pieces, the ‘roughbacks’ the faces on either side of the stone that  are so uneven they can not be used for traditional construction.

 

 

What if the roughbacks could become part of the pattern, of the nature of the building facade, the capitol or the connection to earth, what if the small underscaled pieces used as possible?

 

 

Here is my initial reaction:

the stone could be cut to look like ‘hyposurface.  Large chunks could be used, but smaller ones could be categoriezed and used to make individual triangular panels.

 

the surface could be scanned in, then triangles could be ‘best fit’ into the individual panels.  this could be used to mesh a building faceade with systems like hyposurface, complex window geometries, to create a building rhythm that flows across a building facade.

The shape of the panel would be broken into triangles so that a ordering system could be established, but the triangles themselves could be designed be convex or concave to make patterns, catch the sun, or even create images.

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZysu9QcceM) – interactive wood blocks. — inspiration

http://www.livearchitecture.net/archives/4883 – potential geometry subdivision methods ( imagine an entire facade!)

Please let me know what  you think!

July 9, 2011
general, Research, Work In Progress
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Pattern Making 2

I decided to look at cuttlefish, and consider the patterns that make up there skin surface, and the skin surface of many animals. Two scientists already reviewed and have previously described these shapes. The two men are Gray Scott and Turing.

(Gray-scott Java Applet)

(Turing Java applet)

Example – turing model at set reaction time. (Below)

The reaction pattern itself can be recreated and describe color patterns on giraffes, other fish, and zebras as well.

Ultimately the formulas were to complex to examine in a short time frame, so I decided to examine it at a smaller scale.

I designed a component that would link with itself.

(gallery)

Then I made it read the location of an attractor point.

I defined the distance to a random point, and used that to determine the size of the opening in the model.

The opening would then create a 1-0, black white scale, and across the surface, create a gradiant that would mimic the surface of an animal.

Unfortunately, complex definitions in grasshopper require a deeper understanding of parameter trees than I currently have. For the short term, I left the connector system out, and examined the patterning algorythm.

 

After I overcame several difficulties in Grasshopper I began cutting the material.

 

 

July 7, 2011
Featured, general, Research, Work In Progress
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